What is Apologetics?

Apologetics may be simply defined as the defense of the Christian faith. The word “apologetics” derives from the Greek word apologia, which was originally used as a speech of defense or an answer given in reply. In ancient Athens it referred to a defense made in the courtroom as part of the normal judicial procedure. After the accusation, the defendant was allowed to refute the charges with a defense or reply (apologia). The word appears 17 times in noun or verb form in the New Testament, and both the noun (apologia) and verb form (apologeomai) can be translated “defense” or “vindication” in every case.

Saturday, May 9, 2009

Part 5: Are the Accounts of What the Angels Told the Women in Conflict with One Another? No.

We have seen up to this point that the Garden Tomb accounts demonstrate very clearly that the gospel writers' personalities were in tact toward what the Spirit superintended each of their writings.  For skeptics like the one who is catalyst to this my posting a response to this series, this next posting is going to reinforce my previous point even stronger.

Setting up the "Problem"

As you will see from the charges made by the skeptic, at least in this instance, that there is much neglect to the context of the entire event.  Here is what is challenged:

#1:  In speaking to Matthew's gospel it has been alleged that the angel invited the two women into the tomb and told them to inform the disciples that he would be showing up in Galilee. (Matt 28:1-8)

#2:  In Mark's gospel the person states that the "man in white tells them to inform the disciples that he’ll be showing up in Galilee." (Mark 16:1-8)

#3:  It is challenged that the "two men in white don’t speak." (Luke 24:1-12) and 

#4:  Our skeptical friend asserts that Mary Magdalene "finds Peter and tells him the stone is rolled away and that she also informs the “beloved disciple.”" (John 20:1-13)

What Do the Passages Say?

So that there is no question to the texts that are being challenged, I am going to quote the passages so that we can review them in the response.


Matthews gospel: 5The angel said to the women, "Do not be afraid; for I know that you are looking for Jesus who has been crucified. 6"He is not here, for He has risen, just as He said. Come, see the place where He was lying. 7"Go quickly and tell His disciples that He has risen from the dead; and behold, He is going ahead of you into Galilee, there you will see Him; behold, I have told you."

Mark’s gospel: 6And he said to them, "Do not be amazed; you are looking for Jesus the Nazarene, who has been crucified He has risen; He is not here; behold, here is the place where they laid Him. 7"But go, tell His disciples and Peter, 'He is going ahead of you to Galilee; there you will see Him, just as He told you.'"

Luke’s gospel: 5and as the women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, the men said to them, "Why do you seek the living One among the dead?  6"He is not here, but He has risen Remember how He spoke to you while He was still in Galilee, 7saying that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again." (Please be reminded that our skeptic stated that the angels/men in white do not speak)

John’s gospel: 13And they said to her, "Woman, why are you weeping?" She said to them, "Because they have taken away my Lord, and I do not know where they have laid Him."

Response to the Challenge.

The common message that was told the women here in these passages is that “He is not here” (Mt 28:6; Mark 16:6; Luke 24:6).  John’s gospel gives us a totally different perspective of the empty tomb through the persons that he chose to record under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit.  

The challenger of these passages makes the statement that Luke’s gospel that the angels (men) did not say anything (#3).  In all actual fact, the words of the angels (men) are recorded for us in 24:6, “He is not here, but He has risen.”  This shows us that the challenge is demonstrating a lack of looking at the entire context of the account before presenting this challenge to the text.

Given that we have these facts in hand, it is very clear that while the writers wrote different words, and that they had different audiences, it still remains clear that these passages are not in contradiction to any of the others in this instance.



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